How To Get Your Ex Back – Magic of Making Up

Posted on: July 25th, 2013 by admin

How To Get Your Ex Back - Magic of Making UpClick Image To Visit SiteZzzzziiiiiip…CRASH!…and then the shattering sound of glass as Deidre hurls Al’s Playstation 3 from the 2nd story apartment window…followed by a shrill and sobbing “GET OUT!…GET OUT!…GET OooooUT!”

See,IT WAS THE LAST STRAW! Even though Al loved Deidre with all his heart…he had lied so often… had ignored Deidre so much that she just reached her boiling point that hot, muggy summer afternoon.
Continue Reading

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Conflict Healing: Relational Health

Posted on: January 27th, 2015 by admin

Conflict Healing: Relational Health

 
 
  
Conflict Healing: Relational Health

 
  

Product Description: Conflict Healing: Relational Health


The content in this book is presented in two parts:

How to Deal with Tension in Relationships; and,

How to Resolve Conflicts the Bible Way.

The first part deals with different “mentalities” and how to strengthen your relationships―and your human psyche―while dealing with tension.

The second part deals with different trespasses and offenses―categories of problems―that must be addressed if we are to progress in our mental and emotional (and sometimes physical) growth … and, especially, in our spiritual growth with the LORD.

Both parts of the book include not only “How To do It” guidelines that work, but also examples―real life and personal examples―some, even embarrassing.

The reason the book is presented in these two formats is first, to help the reader recognize the different personality dynamics involved and the processes for resolving pertinent issues―and, secondly, to discover exact Biblical principles for successful conflict resolution.

It works! Just pray and give it a try. Then, spend the rest of your life in peace, power and production! …read more on this page
 

We have searched the web to find the best prices available. Click Here to find out where to get the best deal on Conflict Healing: Relational Health

Note: Buy the Conflict Healing: Relational Health. This stuff is currently available, Sometime only 2 left in stock (more on the way), you can get it for only best price click here as well instead of making a trip to the complicated store.

 


Check for Special Price Today!

buy Conflict Healing: Relational Health

Customer Reviews
There are no customer reviews for this item.

Be the first to review this item on Amazon.com

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

The Loss

Posted on: January 27th, 2015 by admin

The Loss

 
 
  
The Loss

 
  

Product Description: The Loss


“I stared at his cold, lifeless body as I stood over the casket that he was to be buried in. It was the body of my best friend, and my lover.”

A short story by John Hermon. …read more by visiting this page
 

We have searched the web to find the best prices available. Click Here to find out where to get the best deal on The Loss

Note: Buy the The Loss. This product is currently available, Sometime only 4 left in stock (more on the way), you can purchase it for about best price click here as well instead of making a trip to the complicated store.

 


Check for Special Price Today!

buy The Loss

Amazon.com



Oops!

We’re very sorry, but we’re having trouble doing what you just asked us to do. Please give us another chance–click the Back button on your browser and try your request again. Or start from the beginning on our homepage.

product collage
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
Tags:.

Mature Dating: The No Nonsense Guide On Finding Love Later In Life And Having Fun Along The Way

Posted on: January 27th, 2015 by admin

Mature Dating: The No Nonsense Guide On Finding Love Later In Life And Having Fun Along The Way

 
 
  
Mature Dating: The No Nonsense Guide On Finding Love Later In Life And Having Fun Along The Way

 
  

Product Description: Mature Dating: The No Nonsense Guide On Finding Love Later In Life And Having Fun Along The Way

Mature Dating: The No Nonsense Guide On Finding Love Later In Life And Having Fun Along The Way

Limited time offer, get this brand new release for just .99. Regularly priced

at .99. Read on your PC, Mac, smart phone, tablet or Kindle device.

Hi, I’m Maria Hill and I have helped many people who have been out of the dating game for a long time.

You’re about to discover how…

to start dating at age forty and up. If you feel that you are not ready for dating because you’ve been out of the dating scene for too long, this is the book for you. The tips in this book will help you find the right person for you. It may look daunting at first but dating is fun no matter how old you are.

Here Is A Preview Of What You’ll Learn…

  • Increase Your Personal Value
  • Start Looking for a Suitable Partner
  • Using Dating Websites
  • Asking for a Date
  • Getting Ready for Your Dates
  • Elements of a Successful Date
  • Much, much more!

Download your copy today!

Take action today and download this book for a limited time discount of only

.99! You will love it!

Check Out What Others Are Saying…

read more on this page
 

We have searched the web to find the best prices available. Click Here to find out where to get the best deal on Mature Dating: The No Nonsense Guide On Finding Love Later In Life And Having Fun Along The Way

Note: Buy the Mature Dating: The No Nonsense Guide On Finding Love Later In Life And Having Fun Along The Way. This popular item is currently in stock, Sometime only 5 left in stock (more on the way), you can purchase it for just best price click here as well instead of making a trip to the complicated store.

 


Check for Special Price Today!

buy Mature Dating: The No Nonsense Guide On Finding Love Later In Life And Having Fun Along The Way

Amazon.com



Oops!

We’re very sorry, but we’re having trouble doing what you just asked us to do. Please give us another chance–click the Back button on your browser and try your request again. Or start from the beginning on our homepage.

product collage
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Mockingjay (Hunger Games Trilogy, Book 3)

Posted on: January 26th, 2015 by admin

Mockingjay (Hunger Games Trilogy, Book 3)

 
 
  
Mockingjay (Hunger Games Trilogy, Book 3)

 
  

Product Description: Mockingjay (Hunger Games Trilogy, Book 3)

The greatly anticipated final book in the New York Times bestselling Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins.

The Capitol is angry. The Capitol wants revenge.

Who do they think should pay for the unrest?

Katniss Everdeen.

The final book in The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins will have hearts racing, pages turning, and everyone talking about one of the biggest and most talked-about books and authors in recent publishing history!!!!Product Description
Against all odds, Katniss Everdeen has survived the Hunger Games twice. But now that she’s made it out of the bloody arena alive, she’s still not safe. The Capitol is angry. The Capitol wants revenge. Who do they think should pay for the unrest? Katniss. And what’s worse, President Snow has made it clear that no one else is safe either. Not Katniss’s family, not her friends, not the people of District 12. Powerful and haunting, this thrilling final installment of Suzanne Collins’s groundbreaking The Hunger Games trilogy promises to be one of the most talked about books of the year.




A Q&A with Suzanne Collins, Author of Mockingjay (The Final Book of The Hunger Games)

Q: You have said from the start that The Hunger Games story was intended as a trilogy. Did it actually end the way you planned it from the beginning?

A: Very much so. While I didn’t know every detail, of course, the arc of the story from gladiator game, to revolution, to war, to the eventual outcome remained constant throughout the writing process.

Q: We understand you worked on the initial screenplay for a film to be based on The Hunger Games. What is the biggest difference between writing a novel and writing a screenplay?

A: There were several significant differences. Time, for starters. When you’re adapting a novel into a two-hour movie you can’t take everything with you. The story has to be condensed to fit the new form. Then there’s the question of how best to take a book told in the first person and present tense and transform it into a satisfying dramatic experience. In the novel, you never leave Katniss for a second and are privy to all of her thoughts so you need a way to dramatize her inner world and to make it possible for other characters to exist outside of her company. Finally, there’s the challenge of how to present the violence while still maintaining a PG-13 rating so that your core audience can view it. A lot of things are acceptable on a page that wouldn’t be on a screen. But how certain moments are depicted will ultimately be in the director’s hands.

Q: Are you able to consider future projects while working on The Hunger Games, or are you immersed in the world you are currently creating so fully that it is too difficult to think about new ideas?

A: I have a few seeds of ideas floating around in my head but–given that much of my focus is still on The Hunger Games–it will probably be awhile before one fully emerges and I can begin to develop it.

Q: The Hunger Games is an annual televised event in which one boy and one girl from each of the twelve districts is forced to participate in a fight-to-the-death on live TV. What do you think the appeal of reality television is–to both kids and adults?

A: Well, they’re often set up as games and, like sporting events, there’s an interest in seeing who wins. The contestants are usually unknown, which makes them relatable. Sometimes they have very talented people performing. Then there’s the voyeuristic thrill—watching people being humiliated, or brought to tears, or suffering physically–which I find very disturbing. There’s also the potential for desensitizing the audience, so that when they see real tragedy playing out on, say, the news, it doesn’t have the impact it should.

Q: If you were forced to compete in the Hunger Games, what do you think your special skill would be?

A: Hiding. I’d be scaling those trees like Katniss and Rue. Since I was trained in sword-fighting, I guess my best hope would be to get hold of a rapier if there was one available. But the truth is I’d probably get about a four in Training.

Q: What do you hope readers will come away with when they read The Hunger Games trilogy?

A: Questions about how elements of the books might be relevant in their own lives. And, if they’re disturbing, what they might do about them.

Q: What were some of your favorite novels when you were a teen?

A: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
Boris by Jaapter Haar
Germinal by Emile Zola
Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury

(Photo © Cap Pryor)





The greatly anticipated final book in the New York Times bestselling Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins.

The Capitol is angry. The Capitol wants revenge.

Who do they think should pay for the unrest?

Katniss Everdeen.

The final book in The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins will have hearts racing, pages turning, and everyone talking about one of the biggest and most talked-about books and authors in recent publishing history!!!! …read more on this page
 

We have searched the web to find the best prices available. Click Here to find out where to get the best deal on Mockingjay (Hunger Games Trilogy, Book 3)

Note: Purchase the Mockingjay (Hunger Games Trilogy, Book 3). This popular item is currently available, Sometime only 5 left in stock (more on the way), you can buy it for only best price click here as well instead of making a trip to the complicated store.

 


Check for Special Price Today!

buy Mockingjay (Hunger Games Trilogy, Book 3)

Customer Reviews


3,183 of 3,514 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
Unexpected Direction, but Perfection (Potential spoilers, but pretty vague), August 24, 2010
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This was a brilliant conclusion to the trilogy. I can only compare it to “Ender’s Game” – and that is extremely high praise, indeed.

When I first closed the book last night, I felt shattered, empty, and drained.

And that was the point, I think. I’m glad I waited to review the book because I’m not sure what my review would have been.

For the first two books, I think most of us readers have all been laboring under the assumption that Katniss Everdeen would eventually choose one of the two terrific men in her life: Gale, her childhood companion or Peeta, the one who accompanied her to the Hunger Games twice. She’d pick one of them and live happily ever after with him, surrounded by friends and family. Somehow, along the way, Katniss would get rid of the awful President Snow and stop the evil Hunger Games. How one teenage girl would do all that, we weren’t too sure, but we all had faith and hope that she would.

“Mockingjay” relentlessly strips aside those feelings of faith and hope – much as District 13 must have done to Katniss. Katniss realizes that she is just as much a pawn for District 13 as she ever was for the Colony and that evil can exist in places outside of the Colony.

And that’s when the reader realizes that this will be a very different journey. And that maybe the first two books were a setup for a very different ride. That, at its heart, this wasn’t a story about Katniss making her romantic decisions set against a backdrop of war.

This is a story of war. And what it means to be a volunteer and yet still be a pawn. We have an entirely volunteer military now that is spread entirely too thin for the tasks we ask of it. The burden we place upon it is great. And at the end of the day, when the personal war is over for each of them, each is left alone to pick up the pieces as best he/she can.

For some, like Peeta, it means hanging onto the back of a chair until the voices in his head stop and he’s safe to be around again. Each copes in the best way he can. We ask – no, demand – incredible things of our men and women in arms, and then relegate them to the sidelines afterwards because we don’t want to be reminded of the things they did in battle. What do you do with people who are trained to kill when they come back home? And what if there’s no real home to come back to – if, heaven forbid, the war is fought in your own home? We need our soldiers when we need them, but they make us uncomfortable when the fighting stops.

All of that is bigger than a love story – than Peeta or Gale. And yet, Katniss’ war does come to an end. And she does have to pick up the pieces of her life and figure out where to go at the end. So she does make a choice. But compared to the tragedy of everything that comes before it, it doesn’t seem “enough”. And I think that’s the point. That once you’ve been to hell and lost so much, your life will never be the same. Katniss will never be the same. For a large part of this book, we see Katniss acting in a way that we can only see as being combat-stress or PTSD-related – running and hiding in closets. This isn’t our Katniss, this isn’t our warrior girl.

But this is what makes it so much more realistic, I think. Some may see this as a failing in plot – that Katniss is suddenly acting out of character. But as someone who has been around very strong soldiers returning home from deployments, this story, more than the other two, made Katniss come alive for me in a much more believable way.

I realize many out there will hate the epilogue and find it trite. At first, I did too. But in retrospect, it really was perfect. Katniss gave her life already – back when she volunteered for Prim in “The Hunger Games”. It’s just that she actually physically kept living.

The HBO miniseries, “Band of Brothers”, has a quote that sums this up perfectly. When Captain Spiers says, “The only hope you have is to accept the fact that you’re already dead. The sooner you accept that, the sooner you’ll be able to function as a soldier is supposed to function: without mercy, without compassion, without remorse. All war depends upon it.”

But how do you go from that, to living again in society? You really don’t. So I’m not sure Katniss ever really did – live again. She just … kept going. And there’s not really much to celebrate in that. Seeing someone keep going, despite being asked – no, demanded – to do unconscionably horrifying things, and then being relegated to the fringes of society, and then to keep going – to pick up the pieces and keep on going, there is something fine and admirable and infinitely sad and pure and noble about that. But the fact is, it should never happen in the first place.

And that was the point, I think.

0

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No


109 of 122 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars
unrecognizable and unresolved, December 27, 2010

SPOILERS!!!!
The title of my review sums up my feelings about this novel. I was addicted to the first two books. I could not put them down. When it came time to read the last book I kept saying that I needed to pace myself since I knew it was the last but instead I read it in a day. In the end, there was no need to rush. Now, that I’ve finished the trilogy I feel as wronged and empty as Katniss felt at the end of Mockingjay.

First of all, after reading the first two books I viewed this as a story about an incredible character named, Katniss. I felt that the war was a backdrop to the character. This was was what shaped her, matured her, tested her. But, by the end of the series it changed. It became about war, war is bad, blah, blah. Everyone knows this. This is nothing new. I do not need Finnick to get chewed to death or for Prim to incinerate for me to know this. But, what I didn’t know and what I wanted to know was how Katniss would resolve this issue of war, this issue of being a pawn, of loving two different boys. These things were never told to me because she spent the majority of the book hiding, getting injured, being unconscious, staying drugged, or half insane. It was horrible enough that the usually dependable character of Peeta was hijacked but so was the character of Katniss. Her character and her reactions to the Games and the war were what made me invested in this story. There was none of that in Mockingjay. She just simply existed. Gale and Peeta were both seriously injured at the end and she didn’t even try to find them once she healed. Really? These two men she would die to protect she suddenly could care less about them when one got shot and the other got burned? The author seemed too focused on throwing in as many tragedies as possible instead of showing us any genuine reactions or dialogue from the characters the readers cared about. Also, when Peeta was struggling to find his old self back in 13 she did nothing to help him but just kept avoiding him. In fact, that was really what she did the whole story which was such a change from who she was in The Hunger Games.
The second thing I didn’t like was there was just so much pointlessness. When the heroes leave for their mission to assassinate Snow I think that we are finally going to see Katniss take control and stop being a pawn. We are finally going to see her mature and figure out who she’s going to love. I’m waiting and waiting for this pivotal moment. I’ve got no time to grieve for Boggs or Finnick because I’m just trying to hang on to the climax that will make everything worthwhile. It never happens. Peeta and Gale get injured “offscreen”. Prim who stayed in the background for most of the book suddenly gets plopped literally right down into the middle of all the action only to die. I’m still thinking there’s time for this great climax BUT NO! Once again, Katniss gets injured only this time it’s worse. Not only does she watch her sister die but she gets to forever carry scars that will remind her of how her sister died. But, that’s not enough. Apparently, Peeta will also carry the same scars, too, only the readers don’t even get to read what happen to him. All of this just seemed so pointless. I understand that war is bad and unpredictable but it did nothing to move forward any kind of plot or character development. I just felt like the author was trying to hammer home how terrible war can be but people already know this. This story in my mind should have stayed on track with the character of Katniss. Also, just how many people in a book can be “losing it” at one time? You have Katniss, Peeta, Finnick and Annie all having mental problems??? That’s a bit too much.
Third of all, there were so many things unresolved. The resolution between Katniss and her two men just simply happened by chance it seemed. Gale invented the bomb that killed her sister so she simply picked Peeta. It helped that Peeta moved back to 12 and Gale did not. Would she have tried to find him if he didn’t? Did she pick him because he was the only one there? Would she have picked Gale if he moved back? She was never proactive with her choices in the end. Everyone else made all her choices for her. Then there were other characters never fully resolved. Effie suddenly appeared at the end with little written about that. The style team just went away. Gale never really said good bye. There was no scene to find out about how Annie was coping. Her mother had nothing to say to her in the end other than a letter that was never read. Haymitch barely got mentioned once they were back in 12. Johanna had no ending. Peeta should have had plenty to say after what he went through and how Katniss treated him but there was nothing there to reward the readers in the end there, either. Also, the character of Katniss ended up doing pretty much nothing with her life after she stopped being the Mockingjay. Did…

Read more

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No


972 of 1,126 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars
Torn about this book…, August 30, 2010
By 

Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

SPOILERS***************SPOILERS*****************SPOILERS
*
*
*
S
P
O
I
L
E
R
S
*
*
*
Okay, on the one hand, I liked this book. Liked it enough that I couldn’t stop reading because I NEEDED to know what happened–specifically to Peeta. I also liked what happened in the end…but…well…

From the first page of The Hunger Games to the end of Mockingjay, the one thing, the one character that kept me reading was Peeta. I liked Katniss alright, but she wasn’t what drew me into the series. Katniss, like many reviews are saying, was a pawn in this awful war. In the first 2 books she acted against the ‘control’. She rebelled–which is WHY so many people looked up to her. Which is why they wanted her face to be the seal of their rebellion. It made sense. But here’s where I feel Ms. Coillins made a grave mistake in Mockingjay…she eliminated the ‘goodness’ that had motivated Katniss to move forward even when she didn’t want to during the games from her life.

True, this whole series has been about fighting oppression and power. About fighting against a government set out to only make their own lives better, and I felt the first 2 books did that nicely. They were so dark, so horrifying, but inside all of that horror there was a spark of light, of sunshine, and that spark was Peeta and Prim–but mostly Peeta since he was there with her to remind her time and time again the type of goodness that was there to save.

Peeta represented true goodness, love, compassion. He was what kept Katniss from falling over the edge into total darkness. He was her rock, her friend, and no matter how confused she felt–she loved him, even if she didn’t know it yet. The failure in Mockingjay was that, Ms. Collins took that light away from Katniss. There was no goodness anymore, and therefore Katniss lost her own ‘personal spark’. Yet, this was never alluded to in the story. We just saw Katniss growing weaker and weaker, and were never given a reason as to why. People are complaining about how ‘soft’ her character went and I completely agree. But what isn’t being talked about is the reason why. The reason is that Ms. Collins all but removed Peeta from this story.

I don’t know about everyone else, but he was the only bright spot in this entire series for me. Everything was so dark and hopeless–except him. HE was the one the masses clung to. HIS words, HIS light, HIS goodness. He is what made Katniss look so incredible. It was his presence and words that did that. It is my opinion that she could not have risen to the level she was at without him–which is why she fell short in Mockingjay. The dynamic between them and what they accomplished together at both ‘Games’ was what drove the series for me. It wasn’t even so much about the romance–although that DID add another human layer to this story which made it all that much more gut wrenching and true.

All across the review boards, message boards, etc…the main thing people mused about was ‘Who is Katniss going to choose? Gale or Peeta?’ (And really, was there even a doubt as to who it would be? Who it needed to be?) Yet, we get to Mockingjay and the author COMPLETELY obliterated that theme. Sure, we all understand that the war was the main plot, but the HEART of any story is it’s characters and their personal journey. Love being one that drives most stories. The love was all but absent here. Sure, we get a resolution, Katniss chooses in the end, but it doesn’t FEEL good to the reader. We were given no ‘reunion’ scene. We were given no ‘love-filled’ embrace. We were TOLD, ‘and this happened.’ Not fulfilling. Not in the least. Readers need closure. It doesn’t have to be a ‘happily ever after’ which would have been completely off base for this story. But we need to see that in spite of everything that had happened, everything that the characters have suffered, that it had been worth SOMETHING. That everything they fought for, everything so many people died for, was worth something in the end. I’m disappointed because it wasn’t like that. It was more like ‘Yes, I finally admitted to myself that Peeta was who I loved, then I had some babies with him because he wanted them.’

Why, Suzanne Collins? Why? Why couldn’t you let Katniss and Peeta be content afterward? Why couldn’t it have ended with Katniss feeling at least somewhat like what they’d suffered had helped in some way. It ended with Katniss sounding just as depressed and unhappy as in the beginning–even though she had a wonderful husband and beautiful kids. I’m just…incredulous, I guess, that there couldn’t even be a kernel of hope in the end. We all know this story wasn’t a fairytale, and I prepared myself for bleakness. I just never imagined that I would get the ending I wanted (I was actually convinced Peeta would die and I’d be so incredibly mad that I’d throw the book into my fireplace), but…

Read more

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No

Share your thoughts with other customers:

 See all 18,463 customer reviews…

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)